All Learning Resources

  • Managing Your Data: Assign Descriptive File Names

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course. The subject of this module is "Assign Descriptive File Names."  This module was authored by Robert Cook from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).In this module we’re going to talk about how to construct unique file names that can be readily identified and found. The file names should reflect the contents of each file and include enough information so you can uniquely identify the file. The practices have been written for data files, but we think you’ll see that these practices can also be used for other types of files, such as documents, spreadsheets, presentations and even your pictures.  The goal is to have you open a directory on your computer, be able to readily identify the contents of each file and get to the file that you need.   This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Managing Your Data: Backing Up Your Data

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course. The subject of this module is "Backing Up Your Data."  This module was authored by Robert Cook from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Data Formats: Choosing and Adopting Community Accepted Standards

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Choosing and Adopting Community Accepted Standards".  The module was authored by Curt Tilmes from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  In this module, we’re going to talk about formats for your data, and provide some guidelines for choosing and adopting community accepted standards for data formats.  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Creating Documentation and Metadata: Introduction to Metadata and Metadata Standards

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Introduction to Metadata and Metadata Standards".  The module was authored by Lynn Yarmey from the National Snow and Ice Data Center.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

    In this module, we will be talking about metadata. To give you an overview of what this module will cover, we will be discussing terminology related to metadata, look at examples of metadata, bring metadata standards into the conversation and offer some suggestions on how to start implementing some of what we talk about in your lab. We will also give you a few pointers for more information.  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Creating Documentation and Metadata: Metadata for Discovery

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course. The subject of this module is "Metadata for Discovery."  This module was authored by Lola Olsen from the National Aeronautics & Space Administration, NASA, and Tyler Stevens, NASA Contractor for Wyle Information Systems at the Global Change Master Directory, and the Goddard Space Flight Center.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

    In this module, we will provide an introduction to discovery level metadata, talk about key categories of this metadata, and show several examples.  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Working with Your Archive: Broadening Your User Community

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Broadening Your User Community".  The module was authored by Robert R. Downs from the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center which is operated by CIESIN – the Center for International Earth Science Information Network at Columbia University.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA.

    In this module, we will be discussing the relevance that broadening your user community has to data management as well as its advantages to you.  We will talk about ways to assess the current state of your data users, uses and gaps, then ways to develop a plan to broaden your user community.  Finally, we will discuss methods for broadening your user community initially and on an ongoing basis. 
    This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Advertising your data: Agency requirements for submitting metadata

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Agency Requirements for Submitting Metadata."  This module was authored by Nancy Hoebelheinrich from Knowledge Motifs LLC.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

    As an overview, we will touch the following topics in this module: 

    - How the agencies persuade you to make metadata available about your data by submission or publication. Metadata can be defined as descriptive information about your data of the type that is usually found in search portals. 
    - Specifically, we will be talking about the National Science Foundation (NSF’s) required Data Management Plan that motivates you to make metadata available.
    - The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA’s) Data and Information Policy that encourages you to make metadata available.
    - The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA’s) Administrative Order 212-15 that directs you to make metadata available.
    - How the practice of submitting or publishing metadata is promoted by the E-Government Act of 2002 (44 U.S.C 3602).
    Other topics we’ll discuss include the timeliness of the metadata submission, and some dissemination tools and techniques that can help you make your metadata available to the public. This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Advertising your data: Using data portals and metadata registries

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course. The subject of this module is "Using Data Portals and Metadata Registries." This module was authored by Nancy Hoebelheinrich from Knowledge Motifs LLC. Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

    In this module, we will be talking about some common gateways that people often use to find your data: data portals and metadata registries.  We will describe what a data portal is and contrast it to a metadata registry.  We will explain some key information that you will need to know to submit information about your data, and some options for submitting the information to these gateways.  In addition, we will discuss some relevant data portals and metadata registries for science data. This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.
     

  • Using Data Portals and Metadata Registries: Submitting Metadata to the GCMD

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course. The subject of this module is "Submitting Metadata to the GCMD."  This module was authored by Lola Olsen from the National Aeronautics & Space Administration, NASA, and Tyler Stevens, NASA Contractor for Wyle Information Systems at the Global Change Master Directory, and the Goddard Space Flight Center.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).In this module, we will provide an introduction to the Global Change Master Directory, known as the GCMD; describe how to submit a metadata record for your data to the GCMD using the docBUILDER metadata authoring tool; and provide an overview of docBUILDER functionality.  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Local Data Management: Providing Access to Your Data

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course. The subject of this module is "Providing Access to Data". The module was authored by Matthew Mayernik from the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

    In this module, we will talk about how you can provide access to your data. Arguing that data should be openly available and why that is important, we’ll discuss funding agency requirements for making data available and accessible with a focus upon United States Government agencies. We’ll ask the question, who has responsibility for providing access to your data? Despite the diagram’s indication on this slide, it is individuals who need to take responsibility for providing access to their own data in various ways. To help you follow through on that responsibility, we’ll talk generally about the challenges involved in making data accessible. This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Providing Access to Your Data: Determining Your Audience

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Determining Your Audience".  The module was authored by Robert R. Downs from the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center which is operated by CIESIN – the Center for International Earth Science Information Network at Columbia University.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

    When you think about providing access to your data, it’s important to think about the audiences that could use the data itself, but also to those who could use the data products and services generated from them.  The users of the data could be those currently interested in your data as well as future users of the data. Keep in mind that there could be several audiences for your data as they move through the entire life cycle. The audiences might reflect various user demographics or various purposes for using the data, and can certainly change over time.

    Determining the audiences that use your data can help you identify their needs, and inform the development of your data to meet those needs. Development of the data might include the creation of data products and services that you provide to assist users in using your data.  Knowledge of the audiences for your data will help you identify the various products and services that you might offer to current or new user communities, and also help verify that the needs of your users are being met.

    Efforts to determine the audiences for your data should continue throughout the entire data life cycle so that you can improve the user experience. Awareness of the initial users of your data can inform the data development process, as well as your plans for disseminating the data and for providing stewardship to manage the data over time. Observations about later users of your data can inform potential improvements for your data, so you can better serve both your current and your future users.  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Providing Access to Your Data: Access Mechanisms

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Access Mechanisms".  The module was authored by Robert R. Downs from the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center which is operated by CIESIN – the Center for International Earth Science Information Network at Columbia University.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

    In this module, we plan to give you some background and context for the topic and describe its relevance to data management.  We’d like to introduce you to a way to think about the parties who can provide access to your data, and some of the mechanisms that might be used.  We’ll discuss some community considerations and resource considerations for access, and, finally describe some access mechanisms that can be offered by data centers.

  • Providing Access to Your Data: Tracking Data Usage

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Tracking Data Usage".  The module was authored by Robert R. Downs from the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Application Center which is operated by CIESIN – the Center for International Earth Science Information Network at Columbia University.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

    In this module, we will give you some background and context for this topic, and then describe its relevance to data management.  We’ll discuss what data usage can tell you about your data and where you can find usage information.  We’ll also briefly discuss the advantages of tracking data citations.

  • Providing Access to Your Data: Handling Sensitive Data

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Handling Sensitive Data".  The module was authored by Robert R. Downs from the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center which is operated by CIESIN – the Center for International Earth Science Information Network at Columbia University.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

    In this module, we will tell you what sensitive data is and provide some background information about it.  We will discuss why it is important that you identify and manage sensitive data, particularly for science.  We’ll also talk about some important issues to discuss with your archive about managing the sensitive data.

  • Providing Access to Your Data: Rights

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Rights".  The module was authored by Robert R. Downs from the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center which is operated by CIESIN – the Center for International Earth Science Information Network at Columbia University.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

    In this module, we will first provide some background and context on the topic of rights, discuss the relevance of rights to data management and then describe some options that you have for assigning rights, with examples. 

  • Creating Documentation and Metadata: Creating a Citation for Your Data

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course. The subject of this module is "Creating a Citation for Your Data." This module was authored by Robert Cook from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Local Data Management: Advertising Your Data

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Advertising your data."  This module was authored by Nancy Hoebelheinrich from Knowledge Motifs LLC.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.  

    What we will be talking about in this presentation is why and how to advertise your data. When we talk about advertising your data we are thinking of techniques that go beyond word of mouth or informal notice. We’ll discuss the fact that funding agencies and institutions may actually require that you get word out about your published data, and that advertising your data can jump-start your career.
     
    We’ll also talk about different ways of advertising your data.  One of the obvious methods is by submitting descriptive information about your data to various destinations such as catalogs, but there are an ever-increasing number of other methods that can be used as well.  We will cover a couple of those methods in this brief introduction.  We’ll also encourage you to seek the help of the data center or data archive where you’re storing your data to help you advertise your data.  
     

  • Elements of a Data Management Plan: Organization and standards

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Identifying the Materials to be Created".  The module was authored by Ruth Duerr from The Ronin Institute.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).   This modules is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

    The purpose of this module is to introduce you to the range of topics related to data organization and standards that may be important for you to address in your data management plan.  We say may be important because just as every research project is different, so every data management plan needs to be different to accommodate the particular needs of that project.  This means that some topics on data organization and standards will be more important to think about and describe in your data management plan than others.  Which topics are more important will depend on the size, scale, complexity and other details of your project that differentiate what you are doing from what others are  doing.  So… no, unfortunately, there isn’t a one-size-fits all data management plan!  

  • Responsible Data Use: Data Restrictions

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Data Restrictions".  The module was authored by Robert R. Downs from the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center which is operated by CIESIN – the Center for International Earth Science Information Network at Columbia University.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.  

  • Responsible Data Use: Copyright and Data

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Copyright and Data".  The module was authored by Matthew Mayernik from the National Center for Atmospheric Research.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

    In this module, we will focus on copyright law and associated procedures related to data. We don’t often think about data as having intellectual properties as a book or a movie would, but there are some important intellectual property issues to understand about data, especially involving copyright.

    We will first talk about what is and is not copyrightable in the United States with respect to data. Copyright laws can be vary greatly from country to country and jurisdiction to jurisdiction around the world, so we want to emphasize that our discussion in this module will focus upon copyright and data in the United States. 

    We will also talk about open copyright license options and how they apply to data, and how copyright can be used or deliberately waived, in order to make data more open and easier to access and use.  We will also discuss how it’s possible to use non legal means for establishing community based norms to address some of these issues.