All Learning Resources

  • Data Management Planning Part 1: overview and a USGS program experience

    Emily Fort of the USGS presents an introduction to data management planning and a USGS program experience.

  • Data Management Planning Part 2: theory and practice in research data management

    Steve Tessler and Stan Smith present an example of a data management planning strategy for USGS science centers.

  • Introduction to the ISO 19115-2 Metadata Standard - DISL Data Management Metadata Training Webinar Series - Part 2

    Begins with a brief overview of how the components of the ISO 19115-2 metadata standard are organized, followed by an example completed metadata record. Overview of how to use NOAA NCEI's ISO workbooks and EDM Wiki as resources for writing ISO metadata. The video is 34 minutes. 

  • Introduction to Data Documentation - DISL Data Management Metadata Training Webinar Series - Part 1

    Introduction to data documentation (metadata) for science datasets. Includes basic concepts about metadata and a few words about data accessibility. Video is about 23 minutes.

  • LP DAAC Data Recipes

    A collection of tutorials that describe how to use Earth science data from NASA's Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) using easily available tools and commonly used formats for Earth science data.  These tutorials are available to assist those wishing to learn or teach how to obtain and view these data. 

  • Digital Preservation Workshop Module 2: Selection

    Module 2 of The Digital Preservation Network's Digital Preservation Workflow Curriculum introduces the concept of selection for digital preservation and how understanding an organization’s collections landscape can help with planning, selection, and prioritization of digital content for preservation. Lectures will discuss planning, and offer criteria and introduce tools to track and document collections and evaluate their readiness to prioritize submission to a digital preservation service. Participants will consider factors such as legal status, “done-ness” (when is an asset ready to be preserved?), and roles and responsibilities for decision making. They will be asked to look at how the sources of content (whether from digitization or borndigital) affect decision making, and will apply what they have learned through discussions and a case study on evaluation. 

    For background information about this module including learning objectives, goals, resources and lessons, also see: 
    http://dpn.org/dpn-admin/resources/digitalpreservationworkshopcurriculum...

  • Digital Preservation Workshop Module 3: Preparing for Submission

    Module 3 of The Digital Preservation Network's Digital Preservation Workflow Workshop Curriculum focuses on preparing content for submission to a long-term storage service, whether in-house or external to the organization. It will emphasize requisite tasks such as understanding and conforming to submission requirements, local file management prior to submission, and tracking asset status. This module will explore common challenges encountered during this stage in the workflow, such as determining how and when to capture metadata, deciding what is “good enough” to submit, dealing with different content sources (e.g., born-digital vs. digitized), and work through ways of resolving these. A case study will be used to provide participants with experience creating a plan for this stage. A hands-on exercise creating a preservation package according to the specifications of a long-term storage service will expose participants to common tools and approaches for compliance with requirements. It will conclude with a discussion of how the processes reviewed during this module can be implemented in a program that will support all organizational content regardless of type, source, or owner.

    For background information about this module including learning objectives, goals, resources and lessons, also see:  http://dpn.org/dpn-admin/resources/digitalpreservationworkshopcurriculum....

  • Digital Preservation Workshop Module 1: Programmatic Digital Preservation

    Module 1 of The Digital Preservation Network's Digital Preservation Curriculum provides an overview of the workshop contents and approach. It begins with a discussion of the goal of the workshop — providing participants with the capacity to ensure valuable content is stored in a managed environment over the long-term, and enact digital preservation programs at their organizations — and provides an opportunity for participants to discuss what this might look like within different organizational contexts. Participants will look at the factors involved in operationalizing a digital preservation program, and the pathway that content travels along as it nears a long-term storage environment. This module introduces the problem-solving and decision-making framework that will run throughout all subsequent modules.

    For background information about this module including learning objectives, goals, resources and lessons, also see:  http://dpn.org/dpn-admin/resources/digitalpreservationworkshopcurriculum....

  • Digital Preservation Workshop Module 4: Submission and Ingest

    Module 4 of the Digital Preservation Network's Digital Preservation Workflow Curriculum introduces the concept of transferring submission packages to preservation environments. It underscores the importance of logging transfer, upload, and verification events during ingest for the establishment (or continuation) of an audit trail that will track digital assets throughout their life in the preservation environment. Lecture will provide an overview of best practices for submission and the capture of information produced by the related events. Participants will gain experience with tools that support package transfer and will upload submission packages into a local environment and a cloud or preservation service. 

    For background information about this module including learning objectives, goals, resources and lessons, also see:  http://dpn.org/dpn-admin/resources/digitalpreservationworkshopcurriculum 
     

  • Digital Preservation Workshop Module 5: Post Submission

    Module 5 of The Digital Preservation Network's Digital Preservation Workflow Curriculum examines the relationship of the content holders to the preservation service on an ongoing basis following the submission of content. Regardless of whether the preservation environment is internal to the organization, an external service providing organization, or a collaborative consortium, ongoing preservation is a shared responsibility. This module will lay out the various roles, responsibilities, and tasks, and the service framework that will support the establishment of a sustainable preservation program.

    For background information about this module including learning objectives, goals, resources and lessons, also see:  http://dpn.org/dpn-admin/resources/digitalpreservationworkshopcurriculum. 

  • Digital Preservation Workshop Module 6: Sustainability

    Module 6 of The Digital Preservation Network's Digital Preservation Workflow Curriculum introduces some of the standards and best practices for digital preservation program assessment, tools and activities for performing assessments, and developing a business case for digital preservation. Finally, the module provides practical next steps for applying knowledge gained through the workshop. 

    For background information about this module including learning objectives, goals, resources and lessons, also see:  http://dpn.org/dpn-admin/resources/digitalpreservationworkshopcurriculum. 

  • Digital Preservation Workflow Curriculum Development

    The purpose of this workshop curriculum is to provide attendees with: A. An understanding of the goals, processes, and responsibilities involved in the creation of a digital preservation program B. Problem-solving and decision-making skills to enable ongoing, collaborative digital preservation throughout technological, organizational, and content changes.

    This workshop will equip participants with a set of skills and knowledge that will enable them to enact programmatic digital preservation within their organization. It is focused on equipping organizations with the capability to implement and manage a digital preservation program. The workshop modules present the requirements of a digital preservation ecosystem from two parallel viewpoints: 1) governance and program management, including the creation of a unified strategy and the need for cross-organizational coordination, balancing the competing priorities of innovation and maintenance, and 2) asset management, including the selection and submission of content to a managed preservation environment, and ongoing post-submission responsibilities.

    Downloadable workshop modules are available in the Best Practices section of the following page:   http://dpn.org/members .  Module topics include:
    1.  Enabling Programmatic Digital Preservation
    2.  Selection
    3.  Preparing for Submission
    4.  Submission and Ingest
    5.  Post-Submission
    6.  Sustainability
     

  • The Geoscience Paper of the Future: OntoSoft Training

    This presentation was developed to train scientists on best practices for digital scholarship, reproducibility, and data and software sharing.  It was developed as part of the NSF EarthCube Initiative and funded under the OntoSoft project.  More details about the project can be found at http://www.ontosoft.org/gpf.

    A powerpoint version of the slides is available upon request from ontosoft@gmail.com.

    These OntoSoft GPF training materials were developed and edited by Yolanda Gil (USC), with contributions from the OntoSoft team including Chris Duffy (PSU), Chris Mattmann (JPL), Scott Pechkam (CU), Ji-Hyun Oh (USC), Varun Ratnakar (USC), Erin Robinson (ESIP).  They were significantly improved through input from GPF pioneers Cedric David (JPL), Ibrahim Demir (UI), Bakinam Essawy (UV), Robinson W. Fulweiler (BU), Jon Goodall (UV), Leif Karlstrom (UO), Kyo Lee (JPL), Heath Mills (UH), Suzanne Pierce (UT), Allen Pope (CU), Mimi Tzeng (DISL), Karan Venayagamoorthy (CSU), Sandra Villamizar (UC), and Xuan Yu (UD).  Others contributed with feedback on best practices, including Ruth Duerr (NSIDC), James Howison (UT), Matt Jones (UCSB), Lisa Kempler (Matworks), Kerstin Lehnert (LDEO), Matt Meyernick (NCAR), and Greg Wilson (Software Carpentry).  These materials were also improved thanks to the many scientists and colleagues that have taken the training and asked hard questions about GPFs.

  • Data Collection Part 1: How to avoid a spreadsheet mess - Lessons learned from an ecologist

    Most scientists have experienced the disappointment of opening an old data file and not fully understanding the contents. During data collection, we frequently optimize ease and efficiency of data entry, producing files that are not well formatted or described for longer term uses, perhaps assuming in the moment that the details of our experiments and observations would be impossible to forget. We can make the best of our sometimes embarrassing data management errors by using them as ‘teachable moments’, opening our dusty file drawers to explore the most common errors, and some quick fixes to improve day-to-day approaches to data.
     

  • Data Collection Part 2: Relational databases - Getting the foundation right

  • Data Sharing and Management within a Large-Scale, Heterogeneous Sensor Network using the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System

    Hydrology researchers are collecting data using in situ sensors at high frequencies, for extended durations, and with spatial distributions that require infrastructure for data storage, management, and sharing. Managing streaming sensor data is challenging, especially in large networks with large numbers of sites and sensors.  The availability and utility of these data in addressing scientific questions related to water availability, water quality, and natural disasters relies on effective cyberinfrastructure that facilitates transformation of raw sensor data into usable data products.  It also depends on the ability of researchers to share and access the data in useable formats.  In this presentation I will describe tools that have been developed for research groups and sites conducting long term monitoring using in situ sensors.  Functionality includes the ability to track equipment, deployments, calibrations, and other events related to monitoring site maintenance and to link this information to the observational data that they are collecting, which is imperative in ensuring the quality of sensor-based data products. I will present these tools in the context of a data management and publication workflow case study for the iUTAH (innovative Urban Transitions and Aridregion Hydrosustainability) network of aquatic and terrestrial sensors.  iUTAH researchers have developed and deployed an ecohydrologic observatory to monitor Gradients Along Mountain to Urban Transitions (GAMUT). The GAMUT Network measures aspects of water inputs, outputs, and quality along a mountain-to-urban gradient in three watersheds that share common water sources (winter-derived precipitation) but differ in the human and biophysical nature of land-use transitions. GAMUT includes sensors at aquatic and terrestrial sites for real-time monitoring of common meteorological variables, snow accumulation and melt, soil moisture, surface water flow, and surface water quality. I will present the overall workflow we have developed, our use of existing software tools from the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System, and new software tools that we have deployed for both managing the sensor infrastructure and for storing, managing, and sharing the sensor data.

  • Metadata: Standards, tools and recommended techniques

  • Monitoring Resources: web tools promoting documentation, data discovery and collaboration

    The presentation focuses on USGS/​Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership's (PNAMP) Monitoring Resources toolset.

  • How high performance computing is changing the game for scientists, and how to get involved

  • Best practices for preparing data to share and preserve

    Scientists spend considerable time conducting field studies and experiments, analyzing the data collected, and writing research papers, but an often overlooked activity is effectively managing the resulting data. The goal of this webinar is to provide guidance on fundamental data management practices that investigators should perform during the course of data collection to improve the usability of their data sets.  Topics covered will include data structure, quality control, and data documentation. In addition, I will briefly discuss data curation practices that are done by archives to ensure that data can be discovered and used in the future. By following the practices, data will be less prone to error, more efficiently structured for analysis, and more readily understandable for any future questions that they might help address.