All Learning Resources

  • Long-Lived Data: Tools to Preserve Research Data

    This slide presentation provides an introduction to BagIt and Bagger. BagIt is a hierarchical file packaging format designed to support storage and network transfer of digital content. Bagger enables creators and recipients of BagIt packages to confirm that the files are complete and valid. The presentation covers:

    • What are BagIt and Bagger?
    • Installing and running Bagit and Bagger
    • Types of metadata
  • Why Cite Data?

    This video explains what data citation is and why it's important. It also discusses what digital object identifiers (DOIs) are and how they are used.

  • Write a Data Management Plan

    Video tutorial describing how to write a data management plan, for example for a research grant application to an Economic and Social Research Council. A data management and sharing plan can help you consider--when you design and plan your research--how data will be managed during the research process and shared afterward with the wider research community. 

    Research benefits:

    • Establishes how to collect and manage research data
    • Helps keep track of data assets (e.g., when staff leave your institution)
    • Identifies data support, resources, and services
    • Plans for data security and ethical measures
    • Prepares you for data request

    For access to more UK Data Service video tutorials go to https://www.ukdataservice.ac.uk/use-data/tutorials. 

  • RDM for Librarians

    This is an introductory research data management (RDM) presentation for librarians. PowerPoint slides are available for download at the provided URL. The course covers:

    • Research data and RDM
    • Data management planning
    • Data sharing
    • Skills
    • RDM at University of Northampton

    An RDM for librarians handbook is also available at the provided URL.

  • Overview of RSpace Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN) for Researchers

    A demonstration of RSpace, a software system for documenting your research work.

    More information about electronic lab notebooks (ELNs) can be found on the Gurdon Institute website at https://www.gurdon.cam.ac.uk/institute-life/computing/elnguidance. The site includes:

    • What is an Electronic Lab Notebook, and why should I use one?
    • A note about DIY documentation systems
    • Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN) vs Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS)
    • Disengagement - what if I want to change systems?
    • Which ELN would be best for me/my group?
    • Evaluating the product
    • Some current ELN products (suitability, platform, storage, and other details)

     
     

  • Using LabArchives Electronic Laboratory Notebook (ELN) in Your Lab

    LabArchives® is the leading secure and intuitive cloud-based Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN) application enabling researchers to easily create, store, share and manage their research data. Far more than an “ELN”, LabArchives provides a flexible, extensible platform that can be easily customized to match your lab's workflow providing benefits to Principal Investigators, lab managers, staff, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students.

    LabArchives ELN benefits and features:

    • Monitor, engage, and evaluate your teams' lab work
    • Notebook user access can be managed to allow access rights to certain notebooks, pages and/or entries
    • Interconnect all your lab data and image files to your observations and notes
    • Create and adhere to funding agency data management plans which require data sharing (via public URL or DOI)
    • Easily import and access digital experimental data captured from original lab machines produced by hardware/software
    • Lab team can easily upload images and videos directly to their notebook while conducting lab experiments
    • Complete audit control - tracks and stores ALL revisions, by users, for every entry - NO entry can be deleted - Protect IP
    • Publish and share selected data or entire notebooks to specific individuals or the public

    More information about electronic lab notebooks (ELNs) can be found on the Gurdon Institute website at https://www.gurdon.cam.ac.uk/institute-life/computing/elnguidance. The site includes:

    • What is an Electronic Lab Notebook, and why should I use one?
    • A note about DIY documentation systems
    • Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN) vs Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS)
    • Disengagement - what if I want to change systems?
    • Which ELN would be best for me/my group?
    • Evaluating the product
    • Some current ELN products (suitability, platform, storage, and other details)
  • LabArchives Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN): Introduction to Professional Edition

    Demonstration of the LabArchives Professional Edition Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN).

    A wide range of resources for perspective electronic lab notebook (ELN) users can be found on the Gurdon Institute website at https://www.gurdon.cam.ac.uk/institute-life/computing/elnguidance. The site includes:

    • What is an Electronic Lab Notebook, and why should I use one?
    • A note about DIY documentation systems
    • Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN) vs Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS)
    • Disengagement - what if I want to change systems?
    • Which ELN would be best for me/my group?
    • Evaluating the product
    • Some current ELN products (suitability, platform, storage, and other details)
  • Introduction to sciNote Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN) and its Main Functionalities

    Whether you are just beginning your scientific career or already have vast experience, sciNote Electronic Lab Notebook enables you to organize your projects, experiments, and protocols and keep track of it all. It is easy to use, reliable and flexible. During this tutorial we will give you a detailed overview of sciNote functionalities, from experiment design to electronic signatures.

    A wide range of resources for perspective electronic lab notebook (ELN) users can be found on the Gurdon Institute website at https://www.gurdon.cam.ac.uk/institute-life/computing/elnguidance. The site includes:

    • What is an Electronic Lab Notebook, and why should I use one?
    • A note about DIY documentation systems
    • Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN) vs Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS)
    • Disengagement - what if I want to change systems?
    • Which ELN would be best for me/my group?
    • Evaluating the product
    • Some current ELN products (suitability, platform, storage, and other details)
  • sciNote Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN) Features Walkthrough

    sciNote electronic lab notebook enables you to organize your scientific data in a systematic way, which you can quickly find or cluster it together within a report. Every scientist has their own unique way of writing things down in the notebook and sciNote allows this necessary flexibility. In this video, we will walk you through main sciNote functionalities, from experiment design to creating a report.

    A wide range of resources for perspective electronic lab notebook (ELN) users can be found on the Gurdon Institute website at https://www.gurdon.cam.ac.uk/institute-life/computing/elnguidance. The site includes:

    • What is an Electronic Lab Notebook, and why should I use one?
    • A note about DIY documentation systems
    • Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN) vs Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS)
    • Disengagement - what if I want to change systems?
    • Which ELN would be best for me/my group?
    • Evaluating the product
    • Some current ELN products (suitability, platform, storage, and other details)
  • Demonstration of the Open Science Framework (OSF) Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN)

    A demonstration of Open Science Framework's (OSF) Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN). OSF's application is a free, open-source web tool designed to help researchers track, manage, store, and if they choose, share their entire research workflow. 
    A wide range of resources for perspective electronic lab notebook (ELN) users can be found on the Gurdon Institute website at https://www.gurdon.cam.ac.uk/institute-life/computing/elnguidance. The site includes:

    • What is an Electronic Lab Notebook, and why should I use one?
    • A note about DIY documentation systems
    • Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN) vs Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS)
    • Disengagement - what if I want to change systems?
    • Which ELN would be best for me/my group?
    • Evaluating the product
    • Some current ELN products (suitability, platform, storage, and other details)
  • "I'm leaving you... my data!" -- Practical Research Data Sharing Within Your Institution and the Wider Community

    This slide presentation discusses recent developments in research data management (RDM) practices in response to *Horizon 2020, United Kingdom's Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC), Research Councils UK (RCUK), and institutional University of Southampton policy.
    Topics include:

    • Research, data, and repositories
    • European, national, and institutional policy
    • Research Data Alliance - workflows for data publishing
    • Identifiers and data citation
    • Force 11 data citation principles
    • DataCite and digital object identifiers (DOIs)
    • Linking data and publications
    • Scenarios exploring data management concepts and processes
    • How to get researchers' attention
    • Research costing
    • Active data sharing
    • Timeline for implementing institutional data management
    • Biomedical research software as a service (BRISSkit) overview

    *About Horizon 2020 (from https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/horizon2020/what-horizon-2020​):
    By coupling research and innovation, Horizon 2020 is helping to achieve this with its emphasis on excellent science, industrial leadership and tackling societal challenges. The goal is to ensure Europe produces world-class science, removes barriers to innovation and makes it easier for the public and private sectors to work together in delivering innovation.

  • Research Data Management and Integrating an Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN) with a University Research Infrastructure

    Two slide presentations:
    1. An overview of University of Edinburgh research data management policy and implementation
    2. Integrating an Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN) with a University Research Infrastructure: Case Study with Rspace at the University of Edinburgh, which includes:

    • Where demand for ELNs is coming from
    • RSpace - origins and overview
    • RSpace at Edinburgh - linking to files and depositing content in Edinburgh DataStore and archiving in Edinburgh DataVault
    • Platform for integration with other research data management infrastructures

     

  • Introduction to Data Management Planning

    This slide presentation is part of a workshop offered at Riga Technical University, Riga, to research support staff as an introduction to research data managment.  The slide presentation introduces data management plans, which are often submitted as part of grant applications, but are useful whenever researchers are creating data.  See below for instructions on downloading the slides.  The presentation covers the following topics:

    • What is a data management plan (DMP)?
    • Reasons for developing a DMP
    • Horizon 2020 EU Research and Innovation program templates
    • DMP deliverables 
    • Key decisions in DMP development
    • Resources about the DMP review process
    • Example DMPs

    This PowerPoint slide presentation can be downloaded from the provided web page by clicking on "Introduction to Data Management Planning" (11:45) on the agenda. 

  • Demonstration of DMPOnline (Data Management Planning Tool)

    Slide presentation demonstration of DMPOnline is part of a workshop offered at Riga Technical University, Riga giving an introduction to research data management for research support staff.  The slide presentation is designed to help research support staff help researchers create, review, and share data management plans that meet institutional and funder requirements.  The slides can be downloaded by going to item 12:15 on the agenda.  More information can be found about the DMPonline tool at:  http://www.dcc.ac.uk/dmponline.

  • CESSDA Expert Tour Guide on Data Management

    Target audience and mission:
    This tour guide was written for social science researchers who are in an early stage of practising research data management. With this tour guide, CESSDA wants to contribute to increased professionalism in data management and to improving the value of research data.

    Overview:
    If you follow the guide, you will travel through the research data lifecycle from planning, organising, documenting, processing, storing and protecting your data to sharing and publishing them. Taking the whole roundtrip will take you approximately 15 hours. You can also just hop on and off.

    During your travels, you will come across the following recurring topics:
    Adapt Your DMP
    European Diversity
    Expert Tips
    Tour Operators

    Current chapters include the following topics:  Plan; Organise & Document; Process; Store; Protect;  Archive & Publish.  Other chapters may be added over time.

  • How to Customise DMPonline

    This downloadable slide presentation is part of a workshop offered at the Stratford Library and Learning Centre in 2016, and discusses what to consider when customising the Data Management Planning Tool (DMPTool) which is used to create, review, and share data management plans that meet institutional and funder requirements. See instructions for downloading the slides below.  The presentation covers:

    • The concept of guidance by theme
    • An overview of options and follow-along demo
    • Adding templates
    • Adding guidance
    • Customising funder templates

    This PowerPoint slide presentation can be downloaded from the provided web page by clicking on "How to customise DMPonline" (10:00) on the agenda. More information about the DMPonline tool can be found at:  http://www.dcc.ac.uk/dmponline. 

  • Demonstration of Customising DMPonline

    This slide presentation is part of a workshop offered at the Stratford Library and Learning Centre, and provides a practical lab exercise for using the administrative interface to customise the DMPonline tool.  More information about the DMPonline tool can be found at:  http://www.dcc.ac.uk/dmponline. 

  • Introduction to Research Data Management

    This slide presentation is part of a workshop presented at the Library of Birmingham, Birmingham U.K., and provides an introduction to the research data management landscape, data sharing, and data management planning.

    This PowerPoint slide presentation can be downloaded from the provided web page by clicking on "Introduction to Research Data Management" (10:10) on the agenda.

  • Analyzing DMPs to Inform Research Data Services

    Presentation about lessons learned from the DART project, which developed an analytic rubric to standardize the review of data management plans as a means to inform targeted expansion or development of research data services at academic libraries. 
     
     

  • Data Sharing and Management Snafu in Three Short Acts

    A data management horror story by Karen Hanson, Alisa Surkis, and Karen Yacobucci. This is what shouldn't happen when a researcher makes a data sharing request! Topics include storage, documentation, and file formats.

  • Research Data Management and Sharing MOOC

    This course will provide learners with an introduction to research data management and sharing. After completing this course, learners will understand the diversity of data and their management needs across the research data lifecycle, be able to identify the components of good data management plans and be familiar with best practices for working with data including the organization, documentation, and storage and security of data. Learners will also understand the impetus and importance of archiving and sharing data as well as how to assess the trustworthiness of repositories.

    Note: The course is free to access. However, if you pay for the course, you will have access to all of the features and content you need to earn a Course Certificate from Coursera. If you complete the course successfully, your electronic Certificate will be added to your Coursera Accomplishments page - from there, you can print your Certificate or add it to your LinkedIn profile. Note that the Course Certificate does not represent official academic credit from the partner institution offering the course.
    Also, note that the course is offered on a regular basis. For information about the next enrollment, go to the provided URL.

     
  • DCC Curation Webinar: Customising DMPonline

    Demonstration of DMPonline functionality, followed by a demonstration of how to customize DMPonline for your institution. ​DMPonline helps you to create, review, and share data management plans that meet institutional and funder requirements.

  • DMPonline: Recent Updates and New Functionality

    This presentation covers updates and enhancements to the DMPonline  DMPonline helps you to create, review, and share data management plans that meet institutional and funder requirements. Six areas are discussed:

    1. Usability improvements
    2. Lifecycle and review
    3. API for systems integration
    4. Institutional enhancements 
    5. Locale-aware support
    6. Maintenance
  • Organizing and Modeling Data

    This presentation is part of the World Geodetic System (WGS) Data Management Planning Course. It provides a brief overview of data management, databases, and data modeling. Presentation sections include:

    • Why manage data?
    • What is a database?
    • Information systems cycle and models
    • Database design in research
    • A database modeling exercise
    • Structured Query Language (SQL)
    • Tips and tricks/good practice

    Access this downloadable PowerPoint slide presentation called "Data Management for Library Ph.D." course at the 13.15 - 14.15 time slot on the agenda. 

  • Diversity Workbench (DWB) in 15 Steps

    Introduction and demonstration of the Diversity Workbench (DWB), ​a "virtual research environment for multiple scientific purposes with regard to management and analysis of life and environmental sciences data. ​The framework is appropriate to store different kinds of bio- and geodiversity data, taxonomies, terminologies, and facilitates the processing of ecological, molecular biological, observational, collection and taxonomic data" (DWB).

    For detailed information about DWB, go to ​https://diversityworkbench.net/Portal/Diversity_Workbench.

  • Providing and Using (Open) Biodiversity Data through the Infrastructure of the Global Diversity Information Facility (GBIF)

    Introduction to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF), including lessons and achievements from the first ten years of using GBIF. This presentation was part of the Conference Connecting Data for Research held at VU University in Amsterdam. Topics include:

    • What is biodiversity?
    • Biodiversity data
    • History of GBIF
    • GBIF usage trends
    • Primary GBIF data
    • Using GBIF
    • Darwin Core
    • Integrated Publishing Toolkit (IPT)
  • OpenEarth: A Flood of Dutch Coastal Data in Your Browser

    OpenEarth is a free and open source initiative to deal with data, models, and tools in earth science and engineering projects, currently mainly marine and coastal. This presentation was part of the Conference Connecting Data for Research held at VU University in Amsterdam. Presentation topics include:

    • What is OpenEarth?
    • Community
    • Philosophy
    • Features
  • Open Access Publishing: A User Perspective

    Part of the Embracing Data Management, Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Practice workshop, held in Brussels, this talk provides an introduction to open access publishing. Topics include:

    • Benefits
    • Philosophy
    • Requirements
    • Preprints and postprints
    • Tips
  • Tools for Version Control of Research Data

    Research data tend to change over time (get expanded, corrected, cleaned, etc.). Version control is the management of changes to data or documents. This talk addresses why version control is a crucial component of research data management and introduces software tools that are available for this purpose. ​This workshop was part of the Conference Connecting Data for Research held at VU University in Amsterdam.

  • Modern Research Management Workshop

    Introduction to research data management (RDM). Topics include:

    • Data organization, storage, backup, security, and deposit 
    • Benefits of managing and sharing data
    • File formats
    • File naming
    • Data publishing
    • Data reuse
    • Open data
    • Sensitive data
    • Data management plans and the DMPonline tool
  • Data Management Tools

    An overview of research management tools:

    • Re3data to find repositories
    • FAIRsharing and RDA Data Standards Catalogue
    • DMPonline for writing data management plans
    • OpenAIRE for managing outputs and reporting results
  • How NOT to Share Your Data: Avoiding Data Horror Stories

    This presentation is designed to encourage best practice from researchers when sharing their data. It covers basic issues such as repositories, file formats, and cleaning spreadsheets. It was designed for researchers in the sciences who already have some basic awareness that data sharing has many benefits and is expected by many UK research funders. Topics include:

    • Where you should and should not share your data
    • What data should you include?
    • Choosing a file format
    • Spreadsheet use
    • How you should and should not describe your data
  • Dash: Making Data Sharing Easier

    Dash is a self-service tool for researchers to select, describe, identify, upload, update, and share their research data. 

    For more information about Dash go to ​https://www.cdlib.org/services/uc3/dash.html.

  • Research Data Lifecycle

    Data often have a longer lifespan than the research project that creates them. Researchers may continue to work on data after funding has ceased, follow-up projects may analyse or add to the data, and data may be re-used by other researchers.

    Adhering to a well-defined research data lifecycle results in organised, well documented, preserved and shared data that advance scientific inquiry and increase opportunities for learning and innovation.

  • Bringing Research Data into the Library: Expanding the Horizons of Institutional Repositories

    The focus of library-managed institutional repositories has so far been on document-like items (published articles, preprints, theses, reports, working papers, etc.) but there is growing demand to expand their use into new genres such as scientific research datasets (sensor readings, genomics data, neuroimages, etc.). This webcast explains how institutional repositories are including this type of collection, what librarians need to know in order to manage such collections, and a few case studies from the MIT Libraries. ​

     
  • Marine GIS Applications (using QGIS)

    This course provides an in-depth overview of the application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to the marine environment using QGIS. All resources can be accessed from the provided URL. 

    Topic 1:
    Aims and Objectives:

    • Provide an introduction to GIS for marine applications
    • Focus on some publicly available marine datasets
    • Show the potential applications of GIS for the marine environment

    Learning Outcomes:

    • Knowledge and understanding of GIS, spatial data, raster, and vector models
    • Core tasks involved in the GIS analysis process including data acquisition, management, manipulation and analysis, and presentation and output
    • Core functionality of QGIS Desktop and QGIS Browser
    • Creating and editing spatial data
    • Appreciation of coastal and marine GIS data applications

    Topic 2: Introduction to Marine GIS

    • A brief explanation of GIS
    • GIS components
    • GIS data models
    • Marine GIS applications
    • Spatial analysis

    Topic 3: Introduction to QGIS

    • Why QGIS?
    • Exercise: Introduction To QGIS

    Topic 4: View data in QGIS Desktop

    • QGIS provides several windows, convenient for the user
    • Exercise

    Topic 5: Map Projections and Coordinate Systems

    • Geographic Coordinate Systems
    • Coordinate Systems And Map Projections
    • Video: Map projections 
    • Exercise

    Topic 6: Create Base Map in QGIS

    • Define the Area of Interest (AOI)
    • Exercise

    Topic 7: Creating Data Collection from the World Ocean Database

    • Exercise: Obtaining Marine Data from the World Ocean Database

    Topic 8: Introduction to Ocean Data View

    • Video: Ocean Data View (ODV) by Reiner Schlitzer
    • Exercise: Creating Data Collection from the World Ocean Database
    • Exercise: Export Marine Data from the Ocean Data View

    Topic 9: Working with Spreadsheet Data

    • Exercise: Adding Spreadsheet Data

    Topic 10: Edit Data in QGIS

    • Exercise

    Topic 11: Edit Data: Area of Interest and Analysis Mask

    • Exercise

    Topic 12: Interpolating surfaces

    • Map Interpolation
    • Interpolating Surfaces: Summary 
    • Exercise: Interpolate to Raster

    Topic 13: Rendering Raster Data

    • Exercise

    Topic 14: Raster Calculator

    • Exercise: Using the Raster Calculation

    Topic 15: Working with NetCDF

    • Exercise

    Topic 16: Plotting Vector Arrows from U and V Component Grids

    • Marine Geospatial Ecology Tools (MGET)

    Topic 17: Downloading species observations from the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS)

    • Exercise: Downloading OBIS Data in CSV Format

    Topic 18: Creating KML files for Google Earth

    • Example KML document
    • Exercise

    Topic 19: Publication Quality Maps

    • Exercise: Create Publication Quality Maps
  • Quality Management System Essentials for IODE National Oceanographic Data Centres (NODC) and Associate Data Units (ADU)

    Course overview

    The International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE) maintains a global network of National Oceanographic Data Centres (NODC) and Associate Data Units (ADU) responsible for the collection, quality control, archive and online publication of many millions of ocean observations. The concept of quality management has become increasingly significant for these centres to meet national and international competency standards for delivery of data products and services. The IODE Quality Management Framework encourages NODCs and ADUs to implement a quality management system which will lead to the accreditation.

    This workshop provides an introduction for NODCs and ADUs involved in the development, implementation, and management of a Quality Management System based on ISO 9001:2015.

    Aims and objectives

    • To introduce the IODE Quality Management Framework
    • To introduce the ISO 9000 series of standards
    • To provide a description of a Quality Management System
    • To describe the importance of quality management for oceanographic data
    • To describe the accreditation process for NODCs and ADU

    Note that the exercises are no longer accessible.

    Topics include:

    • Introduction to Quality Management Systems
    • QMS Implementation in Meteorological Services
    • Introduction to ISO standards
    • Understanding ISO 9001:2015
      • Overview
      • ISO 9001:2015 Clause 4. Context of the Organization
      • ISO 9001:2015 Clause 5. Leadership
      • ISO 9001:2015 Clause 6. Planning
      • ISO 9001:2015 Clause 7.Support
      • ISO 9001:2015 Clause 8. Operation
      • ISO 9001:2015 Clause 9. Performance Evaluation
      • ISO 19115:2015 Clause 10. Improvement
    • Developing a quality system manual
    • Experiences and lessons learned from implementing a QMS: SISMER
    • Implementing the Quality Management System
    • IODE Quality Management Framework and Accreditation
  • Administración de Datos Biogeográficos Marinos (Contribuyendo al Uso de OBIS) (2016)

    The course provides an introduction to the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS). It includes best practices in the management of marine biogeographic data, publication of data for free access (IPT), access to data, organization, analysis, and visualization. 

    Goals:

    • Expand the network of OBIS collaborators.
    • Improve the quality of marine biogeographic data.
    • Increase knowledge of international standards and best practices related to marine biogeographic data.
    • Increase the amount of freely accessible data published through OBIS and its OBIS nodes.
    • Increase the use of OBIS data for science, species conservation, and area-based management applications.

    There are four modules consisting of Spanish language slide presentations and videos:

    • MODULE 1 - General and concepts
    • Introduction to IOC, IODE, OTGA and OBIS and related to WORMS, Marine Regions, DarwinCore biodiversity data standard, and metadata.
    •  
    • MODULE 2 - Data Quality Control Procedures
    •  
    • MODULE 3 - Best practices in the management and policy of marine biogeographic data and access, organization, analysis and visualization of OBIS data
    •  
    • MODULE 4 - Publication of data for free access (Integrate Publishing Toolkit -IPT)
  • Marine Biogeographic Data Management (Contributing and Using Ocean Biogeographic Information System) (2015)

    The course provided an introduction to the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS). This includes best practices in marine biogeographic data management, data publication, data access, data analysis, and data visualization. Content consists of slide presentations and videos.

    Aims and Objectives

    • Expand the OBIS network of collaborators
    • Improve marine biogeographic data quality
    • Increase awareness of international standards and best practices related to marine biogeographic data
    • Increase the amount of open access data published through OBIS and its OBIS nodes
    • Increase the use of data from OBIS for science, species conservation, and area-based management applications

    Learning Outcomes

    • Knowledge and understanding of OBIS structure, mission, and objectives
    • Installation and management of IPT
    • Use of Darwin Core standards for species occurrence records, taxonomy, event/sample records and additional biological and environmental parameters.
    • Data quality control tools
    • Publishing data through IPT and contributing datasets to OBIS
    • Use of OBIS data access (SQL, web service, API/R). 
    • Data visualization tools (ArGIS online, CartoDB, QGIS, …) 

    Target Audience

    • Marine data managers
    • Staff of NODCs or ADUs/OBIS nodes working with marine biodiversity data
    • Principle Investigators of major marine biodiversity expeditions
    • National marine biodiversity focal points

    Sections 

    • Introductions to IOC, IODE, OTGA, and OBIS
    • Biodiversity Data Standards
    • Data Quality Control Procedures
    • Data Access and Visualisation
    • Social Aspects of Data Management
  • Plan, a chapter of the CESSDA Expert Tour Guide on Data Management

    This introductory chapter features a brief introduction to research data management and data management planning.

    Before we get you started on making your own Data Management Plan (DMP), we will guide you through the concepts which provide the basic knowledge for the rest of your travels. Research data, social science data and FAIR data are some of the concepts you will pass by.

    After completing your travels through this chapter you should be:

    Familiar with concepts such as (sensitive) personal data and FAIR principles;
    Aware of what data management and a data management plan (DMP) is and why it is important;
    Familiar with the content elements that make up a DMP;
    Able to answer the DMP questions which are listed at the end of this chapter and adapt your own DMP.