All Learning Resources

  • Finding stories in data

    When effectively analysed and presented in a clear and compelling way, data has the potential to create impact. At the heart of driving change is the skill of finding and telling stories using, where relevant, compelling visualisations.

    No field is more experienced at finding and telling stories than journalism, and no field better at using data than data science. This set of modules looks at what these fields can learn from each other, in order to find and tell compelling stories with data.  Modules include mini quizzes, videos many visual aids, and opportunities to monitor your progress in completing the modules, and providing feedback.   Data module topics are:
    1. Introduction to data storytelling
    2. The four step process
    3. Understanding your rights to use data
    4. Gathering data
    5. Organising data
    6. Cleaning data
    7. Filtering and pivot tables
    8. Data visualisation formats
    9. Data visualisation best practice
    10. Visual deception
    11. Narrating your story

  • Open data essentials

    Welcome to the Open Data Institute's e-Learning programme developed for the European Commission. This programme has been designed to enable you to discover what open data is and how it is changing the lives of everyone on our planet. There are 13 lessons for you to explore covering the essentials of open data, how to plan and measure success and how to implement an open data programme technically. This programme is free and should take a maximum of 2-3 hours to complete. 

    Modules include mini quizzes, videos many visual aids, and opportunities to monitor your progress in completing the modules, and providing feedback. Module topics include:
    - What is open data?
    - Unlocking value from open data
    - Open data:  agent of change
    - Why do we need to license?
    - What makes quality open data
    - Measuring success for open data
    - Why should we worry about sustainability?
    - Gettting to grips with platforms
    - Choosing the right format for open data
    - How useful is my data
    - How to clean your data
    - finding hidden data on the Web
    - Linking up the web of data

     

  • Author Skills

    The Author Skills modules engage you in a series of readings, hands-on activities and/or group discussions along with assignments designed to help you address many issues in the scholarly publishing process.  How to read, write and publish research outcomes are some of the skills this training will help you develop. Join us to become more effective writers… and better researchers. The completion of the course will take 5-7 hours of instruction depending on the number of exercises finished. Topics include:

    How to Read a Scientific Paper
    An overview of the key activities needed to properly read and understand a paper. It discusses the types of scientific papers, organization of a paper, actions to take – to properly read a paper – and difficulties in reading scientific papers.

    How to Write a Scientific Paper
    Discusses key elements of publishing (ethical issues, style and language, structure and components of a paper including structured abstracts, the article submission process including peer review and author vs. reader priorities. It also includes an Appendix that summarizes the publishing process from a low-income country author’s perspective. The extensive exercises include assignments to write a structured abstract, designate keywords and, from abstracts of articles, decide which journal an article should be submitted to.

    Intellectual Property, Copyright, and Plagiarism 
    Reviews the definition of intellectual property and how it links to copyright and plagiarism. Discusses copyright and plagiarism giving an overview of the concepts providing guidelines and resources. Finally the exercises review the material covered and provide questions to identify plagiarism in several documents.

    Strategies for Effective Writing 
    Discusses the integrated topics of using concrete words and building forceful sentences and reviews the writing processes of editing & proofreading. It includes examples on how to write more effectively.

    Web Bibliography
    An annotated list of links to WWW based, full-text information on how to conduct ethical research, read and write a scientific paper, write a structured abstract, prepare manuscripts for submission and write footnotes and bibliographies. These links give the participants valuable resources that are available on the Internet.

    Reference management tools 
    Reference management tools help scholars to create and manage their lists of references for research projects. Most tools are designed to organize citations into specific formats. Our trainng will teach you how to use two of the most used reference management tools: Mendeley and Zotero.

    Research4Life is the collective name for five programmes – Hinari, AGORA, OARE, ARDI and GOALI – that provide developing countries with free or low-cost access to academic and professional peer-reviewed content online.  Find out more about Research4Life partners and programs at:  https://www.research4life.org/about/ .

  • Data Tree

    Data Tree is a free online course with all you need to know for research data management, along with ways to engage and share data with business, policymakers, media and the wider public.

    The self-paced training course will take 15 to 20 hours to complete in eight structured modules. The course is packed with video, quizzes and real-life examples of data management, along with valuable tips from experts in data management, data sharing and science communication.

    The training course materials will be available for structured learning, but also to dip into for immediate problem solving.

    The course is for researchers, scientists and anyone working with data.

    The course is especially aimed at postgraduates, PhD students and early career researchers who want to learn research data management skills, but it is for anyone who wants to get the right data habits now, including thinking of end-users of your data.

    Modules include:
    1. Data Management:  Context
    2. Data Management:  Practicalities
    3. Data Management: NERC
    4. Data Application:  Analysis
    5. Data Application:  Visualisation
    6. Data & Research:  Working with Policy
    7. Data & Research:  Working with Business
    8. Data & Research:  Working with the Media & Public

  • United Nations Online Access to Research in Environment (UN OARE) Training Materials

    Here you can find training modules on information management training topics that help you learn not only how to open journals and download full-text articles from the OARE website, but also how to use OARE’s search databases to find articles about specific topics in thousands of scientific journals from major publishers around the world.  Topics include:  searching strategies for finding scientific research using environmental issues, accessing full-text articles, e-journals, e-books, and other internat resources such as indexes for searching EBSCO, SCOPUS (Elsevier), environmental gateways and other portals.  Downloadable powerpoint slides are available for each topic along with a workbook for most of the modules.  

  • Reference Management Tools

    Reference Management Tools help scholars to create and manage their lists of references for research projects. Most tools are designed to organize citations into specific formats for the preparation of manuscripts and bibliographies. Many search tools provide ways to download references into reference management tools. 
    This module will help  you develop the skills necessary to use three of the most used management softwares: Mendeley, Zotero and EndNote Web. Exercises using the tool are included in the downloadable slides.  Part A: Mendeley
    Mendeley is a free reference manager and academic social network that can help you organize your research, collaborate with others online, and discover the latest research. In this module you will learn how to:
    • Register to Mendeley
    • Create your Mendeley Library
    • Manage your documents and references
    • Cite references
    • Share Documents and ReferencesPart B: Zotero
    Zotero is a free and open-source reference management software to manage bibliographic data and related research materials. In this module you will learn how to:
    • Install Zotero
    • Create your Zotero library
    • Add references to your Zotero library
    • Manage your documents and references
    • Create bibliographies
    • Use Zotero with MS Word
     

  • Catmandu - a (meta)data toolkit

    Catmandu provides a suite of software modules to ease the import, storage, retrieval, export and transformation of (meta)data records. After a short introduction to Catmandu and its features, we will present the command line interface (CLI) and the domain specific language (DSL). Participants will be guided to get data from different sources via APIs, to transform data records to a common data model, to store/index it in Elasticsearch or MongoDB, to query data from stores and to export it to different formats. The intended audience is Systems librarians, Metadata librarians, and Data managers. Participants should be familiar with command line interfaces (CLI). Programming experience is not required.  Exercises in using the tool and functions are included in the PDF version of the slides presented.
    These materials were presented at the Code4Lib conference (code4lib), Philadelphia, 7-10 March 2016.

  • Digital Preservation for Researchers - teaching modules (Cambridge)

    The JISC Managing Research Data Programme-funded PrePARe project ran from 1 Nov 2011 to 31 July 2012.  It aimed to encourage researchers to take an interest and responsibility in digital preservation of their research outputs. Training materials in digital preservation have been designed to slot into existing training courses on related areas, such as Information Literacy and reference management. Five short modules provide an introduction to why digital preservation matters, and cover the issues of safe storage of digital materials, documentation and metadata, data sharing and re-use and data management planning, to think about these issues early in the research process. The resources consist of a series of slides for each module, and a guide on how the resources can be used, including suggested discussion questions and script for use with the slides.

  • Dataverse for the Canadian Research Community: Developing reusable and scalable tools for data deposit, curation, and sharing

    Presentation on Dataverse at the Research Data Management Workshop 2019 (RDM Workshop 2019), Ottawa, Canada, January 23, 2019. 
    Topics Include:

    • What is Dataverse
    • Scholars Portal Dataverse
    • Platform Features
    • CANARIE Project Goals and Deliverables
    • Roadmap
  • Research Data Management: Simple Ways to Make your Research Life Easier

    This presentation provides concepts related to Research Data Management  with context and examples from the life sciences.  The presentation has a number of versions as it has been offered as a part of the CalTech Data Analysis in the Biological Sciences BE/Bi 103 course. This link goes to v1.4 presented in October 2018.  

  • First steps in Open Science (15 min mini training)

    This presentation "First steps in Open Science" is the result of our group activity at the Foster Open Science Trainer Bootcamp, 19.04.2018, Barcelona.
    It is a “15 min minitraining" including a participatory activity. Your are welcome to use this activity in your training activities. Please read the slide notes for context and instructions.

  • FSCI-AM7: DataViz in R with ggplot2

    This is an introduction to creating figures in R using the package ggplot2. We will show how to read data into R using a few sources, including the data repository Dataverse. We then will introduce ggplot2, which we think provides an elegant and lego-like way to provide an introduction to dataviz. It implements a grammar of graphics that lets users layer graphical elements in a modular and adaptable way.
    This material was taught at the  FORCE11 Scholarly Communication Institute (FSCI), La Jolla, CA, 31 July - 04 August (Session AM7).  The material is a Sspplement to https://github.com/ucla-data-archive/am7-fsci-data-viz/tree/v1.0.  

  • Creating Documentation and Metadata: Creating a Citation for Your Data

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course. The subject of this module is "Creating a Citation for Your Data." This module was authored by Robert Cook from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Local Data Management - Data Formats: Using Self-describing Data Formats

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Using Self-describing Data Formats".  The module was authored by Curt Tilmes from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Using Self-describing Data Formats".  In terms of scientific data within the Earth Science domain, self-describing data formats have become the accepted way of archiving and disseminating data.  The module was authored by Curt Tilmes from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Responsible Data Use: Data Restrictions

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Data Restrictions".  The module was authored by Robert R. Downs from the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center which is operated by CIESIN – the Center for International Earth Science Information Network at Columbia University.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.  

  • Preserving the Scientific Record: Establishing Relationships with Archives

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is “Establishing Relationships with Archives".  The module was authored by Matthew Mayernik from the National Center for Atmospheric Research.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).


    In this presentation we are going to talk about archives, what they do and how they work. We’ll talk about how it’s important for data to be archived formally within archives in order to be understandable and useable over a long time period. There are many data archives for Earth Science data, so there should be one or more that are particularly appropriate for your data.


    We will discuss a few ways that building relationships with archives happen, including discussions about what data you have, where your data will go and how you should go about getting set up with a data archive. This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.   

  • Preserving the Scientific Record: Preserving a Record of Environmental Change

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course. The subject of this module is ìPreserving a Record of Environmental Change.î The module was authored by Matthew Mayernik from the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). In this module, we will be discussing a category of the scientific record that is particularly important to preserve. This module is availablin in both presentation slide and video formats.   

  • Preserving the Scientific Record: Case Study 1 - National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Glacier Photos

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is “Case Study 1 – National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Glacier Photos".  The module was authored by Matthew Mayernik from the National Center for Atmospheric Research.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats. 

  • Preserving the Scientific Record: Case Study 2 - Arctic Temperature Variability Data

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is “Case Study 2 – Arctic Temperature Variability Data."  The module was authored by Matthew Mayernik from the National Center for Atmospheric Research.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).In this module we are going to discuss how preserving a record of environmental change involves preserving natural artifacts as well as the measurements gathered from them, looking in particular at a case study of Arctic climate variability data.  In this case study, the data are proxy measurements not actual temperature readings.  The proxy measurements were used to produce a study of past climate variability.  These data were archived with the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) and have been used as a basis for other studies. We will also discuss how data re-use requires long term archiving, and thorough documentation.  This modulle is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • The Case for Data Stewardship: Preserving the Scientific Record

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Preserving the scientific record".  The module was authored by Matthew Mayernik from the National Center for Atmospheric Research.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). In this module, we will be talking about what the scientific record is, why it’s important, and why and how preservation of this kind of data is important. This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • The Case for Data Stewardship: Enhancing Your Reputation

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course. The subject of this module is "Enhancing Your Reputation." This module was authored by Matthew Mayernik from the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). In this module, we’re going to talk about reputation, that is, why reputation is important. In particular, we’ll talk about how reputation is important in the context of data management, as well as some other important aspects of reputation. This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Agency Requirements: NASA Data Management Plans

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is “Case Study 2 – Arctic Temperature Variability Data."  The module was authored by Matthew Mayernik from the National Center for Atmospheric Research.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). In this module, we will be giving you specific information about what kinds of requirements the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has for data management plans (DMPs).   The goal of this module is not to take a step by step walk through of the process of creating a NASA approved data management plan.  Rather, we plan to give you an overview of what NASA is looking for and, more importantly, places to go to get more information.  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Agency Requirements: NSF Data Management Plans

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "NSF Data Management Plans".  The module was authored by Ruth Duerr from the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

    If you’ve done any proposal writing for the National Science Foundation (NSF), you know that NSF now requires that all proposals be accompanied by a data management plan that can be no longer than two pages.   The data management plans are expected to respond to NSF’s existing policy on the dissemination and sharing of research results.  You can find a description of this policy in the NSF Award and Administration Guide to which we provide a link later in this module. In addition, we should note that the NSF’s proposal submission system, Fastlane, will not accept a proposal that does not have a data management plan attached as a supplementary document.

    Individual directorates may have specific guidance for data management plans. For example, the Ocean Sciences Division specifies that data be available within two years after acquisition. Specifications for some individual directorates may provide a list of places where you must archive your data and what you should do if none of the archives in the list can take your data. They may also have additional requirements for both annual and final reporting beyond the general case requirements from NSF.  In addition, individual solicitations may have program specific guidelines to which you need to pay attention.  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • NOAA Administrative Order 212-15: Management of Environmental and Geospatial Data and Information

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is " NOAA Administrative Order 212-15:  Management of Environmental and Geospatial Data and Information".  The module was authored by Jeff Arnfield from NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

    NOAA, like many other agencies, has its own set of requirements and directives that augment broader Federal level data management mandates.  Ah, but how to achieve compliance?  As with most orders, there is the inevitable “stick:”  anyone receiving NOAA funding -- its own offices and employees as well as contractors, partners and outside researchers – must manage resulting environmental data in compliance with NOAA’s requirements and directives.

    To assist data managers in understanding and meeting those requirements, there is also a bit of carrot: NOAA’s Environmental Data Management Committee, or EDMC, provides access to the directives and various supporting resources, including implementation guidance.  NOAA’s National Data Centers provide additional guidance for data submitted for archiving.  

  • Responsible Data Use: Citation and Credit

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Citation and Credit".  The module was authored by Matthew Mayernik from the National Center for Atmospheric Research.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

    In this module we are going to talk about issues related to citation, specifically data citation, about receiving credit for research work done with scientific data,  how these two concepts are related to each other, and why they are especially important today.   This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Responsible Data Use: Copyright and Data

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Copyright and Data".  The module was authored by Matthew Mayernik from the National Center for Atmospheric Research.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

    In this module, we will focus on copyright law and associated procedures related to data. We don’t often think about data as having intellectual properties as a book or a movie would, but there are some important intellectual property issues to understand about data, especially involving copyright.

    We will first talk about what is and is not copyrightable in the United States with respect to data. Copyright laws can be vary greatly from country to country and jurisdiction to jurisdiction around the world, so we want to emphasize that our discussion in this module will focus upon copyright and data in the United States. 

    We will also talk about open copyright license options and how they apply to data, and how copyright can be used or deliberately waived, in order to make data more open and easier to access and use.  We will also discuss how it’s possible to use non legal means for establishing community based norms to address some of these issues.  

  • Data Management Plans: Why Create a Data Management Plan?

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Why Create a Data Management Plan?"  The module was authored by Ruth Duerr from The Ronin Institute.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
    In this module, we’ll  very briefly review what a Data Management Plan is, followed by a discussion of our top three reasons for creating a data management plan.  These reasons are:  

    First, that proper data management planning should make your work easier and possibly even cheaper than if you had handled your data in an ad-hoc fashion throughout your project;  Second, handling your data properly and documenting them well, can actually improve your standing with your users and with your colleagues, most importantly,  and Last and perhaps least, because your funding agency says that you must.  Hopefully, by the end of this module you will become convinced that while funding agency requirements may be the stick making you create data management plans now, creation of the plans has actually been in your best interest all along.  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Data Management Plans: Elements of a Data Management Plan

     
    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Elements of a Data Management Plan".  The module was authored by Ruth Duerr from The Ronin Institutue.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

    In the module "Why Create a Data Management Plan?” we learned that it is just as important to plan how you will manage your data as it is to plan the rest of your research activities.  Given that, your next question is likely to be “Well what should be in a data management plan?”  Answering that question, at a high level, is the purpose of this module.  In the following slide we give a brief description of each of the components or elements of a plan.  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Elements of a Data Management Plan: Identifying the materials to be created

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Identifying the Materials to be Created".  The module was authored by Ruth Duerr from The Ronin Institute.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). 

    As discussed in the module “Data Management Plans: Elements of a Data Management Plan”, your data management plan needs to discuss the type or types of data that will be produced over the course of your research.  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Elements of a Data Management Plan: Organization and standards

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Identifying the Materials to be Created".  The module was authored by Ruth Duerr from The Ronin Institute.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).   This modules is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

    The purpose of this module is to introduce you to the range of topics related to data organization and standards that may be important for you to address in your data management plan.  We say may be important because just as every research project is different, so every data management plan needs to be different to accommodate the particular needs of that project.  This means that some topics on data organization and standards will be more important to think about and describe in your data management plan than others.  Which topics are more important will depend on the size, scale, complexity and other details of your project that differentiate what you are doing from what others are  doing.  So… no, unfortunately, there isn’t a one-size-fits all data management plan!  

  • Managing Your Data: Assign Descriptive File Names

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course. The subject of this module is "Assign Descriptive File Names."  This module was authored by Robert Cook from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).In this module we’re going to talk about how to construct unique file names that can be readily identified and found. The file names should reflect the contents of each file and include enough information so you can uniquely identify the file. The practices have been written for data files, but we think you’ll see that these practices can also be used for other types of files, such as documents, spreadsheets, presentations and even your pictures.  The goal is to have you open a directory on your computer, be able to readily identify the contents of each file and get to the file that you need.   This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Managing Your Data: Backing Up Your Data

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course. The subject of this module is "Backing Up Your Data."  This module was authored by Robert Cook from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Data Formats: Choosing and Adopting Community Accepted Standards

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Choosing and Adopting Community Accepted Standards".  The module was authored by Curt Tilmes from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  In this module, we’re going to talk about formats for your data, and provide some guidelines for choosing and adopting community accepted standards for data formats.  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Creating Documentation and Metadata: Introduction to Metadata and Metadata Standards

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Introduction to Metadata and Metadata Standards".  The module was authored by Lynn Yarmey from the National Snow and Ice Data Center.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

    In this module, we will be talking about metadata. To give you an overview of what this module will cover, we will be discussing terminology related to metadata, look at examples of metadata, bring metadata standards into the conversation and offer some suggestions on how to start implementing some of what we talk about in your lab. We will also give you a few pointers for more information.  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Creating Documentation and Metadata: Metadata for Discovery

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course. The subject of this module is "Metadata for Discovery."  This module was authored by Lola Olsen from the National Aeronautics & Space Administration, NASA, and Tyler Stevens, NASA Contractor for Wyle Information Systems at the Global Change Master Directory, and the Goddard Space Flight Center.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

    In this module, we will provide an introduction to discovery level metadata, talk about key categories of this metadata, and show several examples.  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Working with Your Archive: Broadening Your User Community

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Broadening Your User Community".  The module was authored by Robert R. Downs from the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center which is operated by CIESIN – the Center for International Earth Science Information Network at Columbia University.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA.

    In this module, we will be discussing the relevance that broadening your user community has to data management as well as its advantages to you.  We will talk about ways to assess the current state of your data users, uses and gaps, then ways to develop a plan to broaden your user community.  Finally, we will discuss methods for broadening your user community initially and on an ongoing basis. 
    This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Local Data Management: Advertising Your Data

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Advertising your data."  This module was authored by Nancy Hoebelheinrich from Knowledge Motifs LLC.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.  

    What we will be talking about in this presentation is why and how to advertise your data. When we talk about advertising your data we are thinking of techniques that go beyond word of mouth or informal notice. We’ll discuss the fact that funding agencies and institutions may actually require that you get word out about your published data, and that advertising your data can jump-start your career.
     
    We’ll also talk about different ways of advertising your data.  One of the obvious methods is by submitting descriptive information about your data to various destinations such as catalogs, but there are an ever-increasing number of other methods that can be used as well.  We will cover a couple of those methods in this brief introduction.  We’ll also encourage you to seek the help of the data center or data archive where you’re storing your data to help you advertise your data.  
     

  • Advertising your data: Agency requirements for submitting metadata

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course.  The subject of this module is "Agency Requirements for Submitting Metadata."  This module was authored by Nancy Hoebelheinrich from Knowledge Motifs LLC.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

    As an overview, we will touch the following topics in this module: 

    - How the agencies persuade you to make metadata available about your data by submission or publication. Metadata can be defined as descriptive information about your data of the type that is usually found in search portals. 
    - Specifically, we will be talking about the National Science Foundation (NSF’s) required Data Management Plan that motivates you to make metadata available.
    - The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA’s) Data and Information Policy that encourages you to make metadata available.
    - The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA’s) Administrative Order 212-15 that directs you to make metadata available.
    - How the practice of submitting or publishing metadata is promoted by the E-Government Act of 2002 (44 U.S.C 3602).
    Other topics we’ll discuss include the timeliness of the metadata submission, and some dissemination tools and techniques that can help you make your metadata available to the public. This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.

  • Advertising your data: Using data portals and metadata registries

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course. The subject of this module is "Using Data Portals and Metadata Registries." This module was authored by Nancy Hoebelheinrich from Knowledge Motifs LLC. Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

    In this module, we will be talking about some common gateways that people often use to find your data: data portals and metadata registries.  We will describe what a data portal is and contrast it to a metadata registry.  We will explain some key information that you will need to know to submit information about your data, and some options for submitting the information to these gateways.  In addition, we will discuss some relevant data portals and metadata registries for science data. This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.
     

  • Using Data Portals and Metadata Registries: Submitting Metadata to the GCMD

    This training module is part of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (or ESIP Federation's) Data Management for Scientists Short Course. The subject of this module is "Submitting Metadata to the GCMD."  This module was authored by Lola Olsen from the National Aeronautics & Space Administration, NASA, and Tyler Stevens, NASA Contractor for Wyle Information Systems at the Global Change Master Directory, and the Goddard Space Flight Center.  Besides the ESIP Federation, sponsors of this Data Management for Scientists Short Course are the Data Conservancy and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).In this module, we will provide an introduction to the Global Change Master Directory, known as the GCMD; describe how to submit a metadata record for your data to the GCMD using the docBUILDER metadata authoring tool; and provide an overview of docBUILDER functionality.  This module is available in both presentation slide and video formats.